Posts filed under Ophthalmology

Anatomic Approach to Ocular Complaints

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Written by: Philip Jackson, MD (NUEM PGY-3) Edited by: Jesus Trevino, MD (NUEM PGY-4) Expert commentary by: Rehan Hussain, MD


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Expert Commentary

Thank you for this excellent diagram, which demonstrates a thorough and systematic approach to the most common ocular complaints one would encounter in the ED.  In assessing a painful red eye, there is so much value in determining whether the discomfort is relieved with topical anesthetics, as you can reliably confine the pathology to the cornea or conjunctiva in those cases. However, a red eye associated with deep achy pain that is not relieved with tetracaine could be caused by scleritis, which is highly associated with autoimmune disease.  If cells and flare are visible in the anterior chamber, uveitis is more likely.  Any history of a recent eye procedure should prompt you to consider endophthalmitis, which can be visually devastating, and warrants urgent ophthalmology referral. 

In diagnosing conjunctivitis, you did a great job of highlighting the importance of a good history in determining the etiology . I would add that asking about sexual history can be valuable, as gonorrhea can present with copious purulent discharge, and chlamydia can present with chronic follicular conjunctivitis. Both would warrant systemic antibiotics and treatment of partners, in addition to eyedrops. 

Acute angle closure glaucoma is a diagnosis that should be considered in almost all cases of unilateral headache. It can mimic migraine, since both may present with nausea, vomiting, and visual disturbances. Checking the eye pressure is the most important step to making the diagnosis. 

Finally, acute onset of floaters and/or flashes always warrants an ophthalmology consult to rule out retinal detachment. Ultrasound is a useful tool to differentiate retinal detachment from posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and vitreous hemorrhage. PVD and vitreous hemorrhages tend to move freely when the eye moves, whereas retinal detachment is anchored to the nerve but still flaps with eye movement.   

Once again, this diagram serves as a very helpful flowchart to trouble-shoot eye complaints in the ED.

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Rehan M. Hussain, MD
Vitreoretinal Surgery Fellow

Bascom Palmer Eye Institute

University of Miami Health System


How To Cite This Post

[Peer-Reviewed, Web Publication]   Jackson P, Trevino J (2018, October 22). Anatomic approach to ocular complaints.  [NUEM Blog. Expert Commentary by Hussain R]. Retrieved from http://www.nuemblog.com/blog/ocular-complaints


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Open Globe Injury

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Written by: Justine Ko, MD (NUEM PGY-1) Edited by: Hashim Zaidi, MD (NUEM PGY-3)  Expert commentary by:  Rehan Hussain, MD


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Expert Commentary

Hi Drs. Ko & Zaidi,

Thank you for this great review on emergency management of open globe injuries. The presentation of open globe injuries can vary widely depending on the mechanism of injury, and so can the final visual outcome. For obvious ruptured globes with peaked pupils or extruding intraocular contents, I am glad you emphasized that it is best to avoid any manipulation of the eye to prevent further extrusion of contents or increase the risk of infection. Cover the eye with a shield, start topical and systemic antibiotics, and consult ophthalmology so they can arrange surgery in a timely manner. The patient must be kept NPO to avoid delaying surgery unnecessarily. Definitely don’t check the eye pressure if you already know it is a ruptured globe.

For the less obvious ruptured globes, which may sometimes mimic a corneal or conjunctival abrasion, it is imperative to perform a Seidel test carefully. This involves placing a wet fluorescein strip (not the pre-made drop) over the suspected entry site, looking at it under the cobalt blue light of the slit lamp, and checking to see if a stream of aqueous fluid is coming out of the injury site (it can be either quick or a slow stream). Fluorescein staining in absence of a stream of fluid indicates that only an abrasion is present. When in doubt, consult ophthalmology for confirmation. Other slit lamp findings that may be present include subconjunctival hemorrhage, chemosis, corneal abrasion, hyphema, flat anterior chamber, iris defects, foreign body in the anterior chamber, or traumatic cataract.

For imaging workup, CT of the ORBITS is preferable, as it allows for 1 mm sections that increase the likelihood of detecting small intraocular foreign bodies (IOFB) that might be missed with a standard head CT. MRI should be avoided as it is slow, costly, and can cause movement of metallic IOFBs, causing further damage to the eye. Gentle ultrasound over the closed eyelids could be used in absence of availability of CT, but I prefer to avoid it since puts pressure on the eye.

The patient and family members are often times distraught over the injury, and appropriate counseling is an essential part of the encounter. They frequently ask if they will be permanently blind. I avoid making any predictions on the final visual outcome, as it is difficult to predict and can lead to either unmet expectations or unnecessary anxiety. I say that the goal is to save the eye at this time, and we will follow closely to see how the vision turns out. Sometimes patients do very well if the extent of injury is not severe, but on other occasions patients require multiple surgeries to correct associated retinal detachment, vitreous hemorrhage, or lens dislocation. If appropriate antibiotic therapy is not initiated, there is an increased risk of developing endophthalmitis, which portends a poor visual prognosis.

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Rehan Hussain, MD

Vitreoretinal Surgery Fellow,  Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Univeristy of Miami

 

 


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How to cite this post

[Peer-Reviewed, Web Publication]  Ko J,  Zaidi H  (2018, Feb 26). Open Globe Injury.  [NUEM Blog. Expert Commentary By Hussain R]. Retrieved from http://www.nuemblog.com/blog/globe-rupture. 


Resources

  1. Alteveer, J and Lahmann B. 2010. “An Evidence-Based Approach To Traumatic Ocular Emergencies.” Emergency Medicine Practice, 12(5): 1-24. 2017.

  2. “Emergency Management of Traumatic Eye Injuries | 2001-07-01 | AHC Media: Continuing Medical Education Publishing.” 2017. Accessed October 6. https://www.ahcmedia.com/articles/71714-emergency-management-of-traumatic-eye-injuries.

  3. Guluma K, Lee JE. Ophthalmology. In: Gausche-Hill M, Hockberger R, Walls R, eds. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier, Inc. 2018:790-819.e3.

  4. Bord, Sharon P., and Judith Linden. 2008. “Trauma to the Globe and Orbit.” Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, Ophthalmologic Emergencies, 26 (1): 97–123. doi:10.1016/j.emc.2007.11.006.

  5. “Trauma: Open-Globe Injuries.” 2015. American Academy of Ophthalmology. November 4. https://www.aao.org/pediatric-center-detail/open-globe-injuries.

  6. Harlan JB, Pieramici DJ. Evaluation of patients with ocular trauma. Ophthalmol Clin N Am. 2002;15:153-161. (Review article)

  7. Ahmed, Y, A M Schimel, A Pathengay, M H Colyer, and H W Flynn. 2012. “Endophthalmitis Following Open-Globe Injuries.” Eye 26 (2): 212–17. doi:10.1038/eye.2011.313.

  8. Arey, Mark L., V. Vinod Mootha, Anthony R. Whittemore, David P. Chason, and Preston H. Blomquist. 2007. “Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Occult Open-Globe Injuries.” Ophthalmology 114 (8): 1448–52. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2006.10.051.

A Visual Guide to Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness. While most cases are due to chronic open-angle glaucoma, acute angle-closure glaucoma is an ophthalmic emergency. This week we present a visual guide to successful management of these patients in the emergency department. 

Color Coded Clarity

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) has been attempting to reduce errors in ophthalmic drops since the mid-90’s with the advocacy of a uniform color coded system for topical ocular medications. This standardized color system would then theoretically help patients and providers identify medications correctly and reduce errors both inpatient and outpatient.